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  • Cleanroom Wipers

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    Cleanroom Gloves
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    Cleanroom Adhesive Mats
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    Cleanroom Apparel

What you don’t know about flammable liquid use in your cleanroom…

  1. Procurement, storage and document control of flammable solvents is not a walk in the park. Chemical purchasing, storage, blending, dispensing, usage, and disposal require internal resources. Updated MSDS documentation must be keep on-site.

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2. Bulk chemical blending and batch filling of squeeze bottles requires protective gear, a dedicated chemical handling fume hood, and a hazardous material plan. Liquid solvents represent a higher flammability risk “3”, versus a lower flammability risk “2” for the same solvent that is pre-saturated into a wiper substrate.

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3. Operator exposure to an outgassing solvent in an air turbulent controlled environment is not an OSHA winning strategy. At normal room temperatures, liquid solvents give off enough vapors to form burnable mixtures with air, which represents an environmental safety risk. Outgassing volatile organic solvents represent an operator toxic inhalation risk.

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4. Disposal requirements of a flammable liquid. Good manufacturing practices recommends complete traceability of flammable solvents from cradle to grave.

insp with drums


Reduce your operator volatile organic liquid solvent exposure while improving your wiper efficacy with the Valutek Pre-Wetted Wipers solution.

How?  Valutek eliminates these non-value added activities that pose environmental liability and employee exposure risk to your organization.

  • Safety:  Eliminate the need for in-plant mixing, solvent handling & transport, and open solvent containers throughout your critical environment.
  • Environmental awareness: by eliminating solvent cans and excessive solvent use, Pre-Saturated wipes reduce needless evaporation, and overuse of volatile organic compounds
  • Efficacy: Wipers are wetted to exactly 38% of the total wiper sorbent capacity  to ensure ideal mix of dwell time, and cleaning capability. An “over-saturated” wiper cross-contaminates particles. Independent studies confirm that operators “over-saturate” their dry wiper.

  • Cost Reduction: Pre-Wetted wipers eliminate all the direct and indirect costs associated with solvent handling.
  • Vacuum sealed: All chemistry is driven into wiper substrate, ensuring uniform saturation from the wiper edge to center, and from the first to the last dispensed pre-wetted wiper.
  • Innovative 3 layer film:  Transparent packaging with a lower vapor barrier transmission rate versus traditional metallic film.
  • Custom cleaning Solution:  Choose the wiper substrate (non-woven & polyester), edge treatment (knife, laser, & ultrasonic), the chemistry and concentration you need.  Valutek will manufacturer to you specification with no minimum order, to ensure maximum shelf life.

Valutek Pre-Wetted Wipers Engineered Solution

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Compounding Pharmacies Not All at PAR by Greg Heiland

The generally accepted best practices in both the life science and advanced material market have benefited from years of trial and error, and the best efforts of leading technical/quality colleagues. Marc Stranz, a pharmacist since 1978 and a member of the USP sterile compounding panel, states, “Sterile Compounding Pharmacies are not all at PAR, they have not all figured it out, and it is still too much go-go. The Sterile Compounding Pharmacy market could benefit from collaborating with the standards already developed by IEST and FDA.”

Small pharma

Until the New England Compounding Pharmacy shipped 17,000 vials of contaminated steroid syringes in 2012, triggering a fungal meningitis outbreak which killed 64 people, small pharma was under the radar. Although all licensed pharmacists are trained in basic aseptic technique in pharmacy school from a theoretical perspective, there is a lack of practical knowledge. For example, while the pharmacist was taught about the laminar flow patterns in hoods, (s)he was not instructed in the importance of aseptic operator protocol (i.e. sterile gloves and apparel). The pharmacist was taught the HOW without the much needed WHY base knowledge.

The pharmacist is challenged to perform at the highest level of their license. That is, to fully participate in the clinical care and medical management of the patient. The highest and best value of the pharmacist is not developing and ensuring compliance with the SOP (standard operating procedures) for compounding. Although the pharmacist is technically competent in drug formulation, these competing interests are problematic.

The first standard of any type in small pharma occurred in 1991 with the “Joint Commission,” which focused exclusively on the home infusion subset of the sterile compounding pharmacy market. Although adherence to this new standard was not mandatory, the commercial insurers required accreditation for all home infusion for reimbursement. The financial incentive model was an effective enforcement tool.

It was not until 2004 that the first reference standard was introduced for the whole compounding pharmacy market, USP 797. This unenforceable standard is a diluted version of the FDA cGMP guidance 503. The standard has significant shortcomings, including the omission of requiring sterile apparel and wipers when doing aseptic compounding. There has been a gradual migration to USP 797.

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Cleanroom Glove Packaging. Not all gloves are packed equal

Is your glove packaged in a dispenser box? Is it labeled ‘examination glove’ ?

If so, it is not suitable for a critical environment. Why? Boxed exam gloves are designed to protect the operator. Cleanroom Gloves are engineered to both protect the operator and your critical product.

cleanroom glove packaging

 

Controlled environment gloves are flat packaged in a critical environment with the cuffs all to one end in two stacks of 50 each, double poly-bagged 100 per pack, 10 packs per case in a carton liner to ensure product integrity. Boxed gloves are not.

Over 98% of thin-wall, powder-free gloves are used in medical / lab / industrial applications. Operators of controlled environments often unknowingly procure a glove not designed to their application. Powder-free lab / industrial / medical grade boxed gloves are not suitable for a controlled environment because:

  • Boxed gloves are powder-free, not particulate-free. Uncoated chipboard dispenser boxes shed particles, and contaminate the powder-free gloves.
  • Dispenser boxes force operators to contaminate glove when donning. Operators’ bare hand should only make cuff contact.
  • Additives and fillers are often used in boxed gloves which reduce ESD compatibility (surface resistivity), and negatively impact glove cleanliness.
  • No post-processing to reduce surface contamination left from the dipping process

Engineered to protect your Product, Process & Operator

Valutek’s gloves are packed in double poly bags, vacuum sealed, flat packed in carton boxes and with a carton liner. All gloves are critical environment compatible, lot traceable with retention samples held in quality control for 36 months from date of manufacturing.

Vacuum seal benefit: better storage, no particulate release, no ESD issue

cleanroom glove packaging

 

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Missions to Study Climate Change & Weather on Earth

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is known for its exploration of space, but the La Cañada Flintridge facility is starting to focus its gaze back to Earth. Three new missions scheduled to launch in 2014 will examine soil moisture, wind, and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The data obtained from the orbiters sent on these missions can be used by farmers, meteorologists and others in understanding how the planet works, scientists said. “Last year was the year of Mars,” said JPL Director Charles Elachi on Tuesday. “This is the year of Earth science.” Elachi and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden donned white coveralls and head coverings Tuesday during a tour of a chamber in JPL’s spacecraft assembly facility, also known as the “clean room,” where instruments for the missions are currently being assembled and tested. The Carbon Observatory-2 satellite was absent from the test facility, but talk of the upcoming mission led to discussions about how the agency will address the changing global climate…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

SUNY’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) Transforms Kodak Cleanroom

SUNY’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) will revitalize a vacant Kodak cleanroom building in Rochester, N.Y., by transforming it into a first-of-its-kind CNSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing and Technology Development Facility for crystalline silicon photovoltaics. Renovation is underway to transform the 57,000 ft2 building, which was formerly occupied by Kodak’s MEMS inkjet facility before it closed last October. The initiative will enable more than 100 high-tech jobs and includes the fitting up of a 20,000-square ft2 cleanroom. A late fall opening is anticipated. The first initiative as part of the project will relocate a critical component of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SunShot initiative from California’s Silicon Valley to Upstate New York…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

Satellite Built by UAH Students ’99 Percent’ Ready for October Launch on NASA Rocket

The spacecraft conceived and built in Huntsville is virtually ready for launch and blast-off is less than three months away.

No, the Space Launch System is not suddenly on an accelerated program. Instead, it’s a group of students at the University of Alabama in Huntsville who have been working for more than three years on a tiny satellite that is scheduled to be sent into space in October.

Members of the Space Hardware Club at UAH were in San Luis Obispo, Calif., last week on the campus of California Polytechnic State University. The Cal Poly visit was to put the ChargerSat1 through readiness tests as a final hurdle toward the scheduled Oct. 30 launch.

The satellite got a “good thumbs-up,” according to team member Mark Becnel.

“We’re well past 99 percent (ready),” he said.

The project began in 2010 when the club applied for a spot on a future NASA launch…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

Microfluidic Breakthrough in Biotechnology

Chemical flasks and inconvenient chemostats for cultivation of bacteria are likely soon to be discarded. Researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw were first to construct a microfluidic system allowing for merging, transporting and splitting of microdroplets. Since now, hundreds of different bacteria cultures can be maintained simultaneously in a single system, which could speed up the research on restistance of bacteria to antibiotics.

We could safely say that without chemical flask there would be no chemistry at all. It has been since years, however, the chemists’ dream to be able to downscale to the microscale the operations that are easily performed with large quantities of chemicals inside flasks, including refilling, mixing, pouring out. The first microfluidic system capable of performing all the typical operations with chemicals inside miniscule droplets has been presented just now. The device, fabricated by a group of researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS), headed by Dr Piotr Garstecki…

Click Here to Read the full Article.

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