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  • Cleanroom Wipers

  • Cleanroom Gloves

    Cleanroom Gloves
  • Cleanroom Adhesive Mats

    Cleanroom Adhesive Mats
  • Cleanroom Apparel

    Cleanroom Apparel

Cleanroom Glove Packaging. Not all gloves are packed equal

Is your glove packaged in a dispenser box? Is it labeled ‘examination glove’ ?

If so, it is not suitable for a critical environment. Why? Boxed exam gloves are designed to protect the operator. Cleanroom Gloves are engineered to both protect the operator and your critical product.

cleanroom glove packaging

 

Controlled environment gloves are flat packaged in a critical environment with the cuffs all to one end in two stacks of 50 each, double poly-bagged 100 per pack, 10 packs per case in a carton liner to ensure product integrity. Boxed gloves are not.

Over 98% of thin-wall, powder-free gloves are used in medical / lab / industrial applications. Operators of controlled environments often unknowingly procure a glove not designed to their application. Powder-free lab / industrial / medical grade boxed gloves are not suitable for a controlled environment because:

  • Boxed gloves are powder-free, not particulate-free. Uncoated chipboard dispenser boxes shed particles, and contaminate the powder-free gloves.
  • Dispenser boxes force operators to contaminate glove when donning. Operators’ bare hand should only make cuff contact.
  • Additives and fillers are often used in boxed gloves which reduce ESD compatibility (surface resistivity), and negatively impact glove cleanliness.
  • No post-processing to reduce surface contamination left from the dipping process

Engineered to protect your Product, Process & Operator

Valutek’s gloves are packed in double poly bags, vacuum sealed, flat packed in carton boxes and with a carton liner. All gloves are critical environment compatible, lot traceable with retention samples held in quality control for 36 months from date of manufacturing.

Vacuum seal benefit: better storage, no particulate release, no ESD issue

cleanroom glove packaging

 

IBM: What Makes This Tiny Chip a Breakthrough

IBM showed off a prototype chip today that is being hailed as a technological breakthrough for the tiny transistors — electrical switches that help power a computer — that have been made so thin they’re 1/10,000th the width of a human hair.

The breakthrough — the result of research at IBM and the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute in Albany — could allow as many as 20 billion transistors to be placed on a chip the size of a fingernail and is half the size of the current 14 nanometer standard, company officials said. A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter.

While the technology is a prototype chip, it could have a tremendous impact “on the anticipated demands of future cloud computing and Big Data systems, cognitive computing, mobile products and other emerging technologies,” according to the company.

Moore’s Law: What’s in Store For the Next 50 Years of Computing Power

The breakthrough chip is the result of a $3 billion investment IBM made last year in partnership with the state of New York, Samsung and other technology suppliers for the purpose of chip research and design, officials said.

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

 

operators-at-suny

Satellite Built by UAH Students ’99 Percent’ Ready for October Launch on NASA Rocket

The spacecraft conceived and built in Huntsville is virtually ready for launch and blast-off is less than three months away.

No, the Space Launch System is not suddenly on an accelerated program. Instead, it’s a group of students at the University of Alabama in Huntsville who have been working for more than three years on a tiny satellite that is scheduled to be sent into space in October.

Members of the Space Hardware Club at UAH were in San Luis Obispo, Calif., last week on the campus of California Polytechnic State University. The Cal Poly visit was to put the ChargerSat1 through readiness tests as a final hurdle toward the scheduled Oct. 30 launch.

The satellite got a “good thumbs-up,” according to team member Mark Becnel.

“We’re well past 99 percent (ready),” he said.

The project began in 2010 when the club applied for a spot on a future NASA launch…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

Paper-Thin E-Skin Responds to Touch

A new milestone by engineers at UC Berkeley can help robots become more touchy-feely, literally.

A research team led by Ali Javey, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, has created the first user-interactive sensor network on flexible plastic. The new electronic skin, or e-skin, responds to touch by instantly lighting up. The more intense the pressure, the brighter the light it emits.

“We are not just making devices; we are building systems,” says Javey, who also has an appointment as a faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). “With the interactive e-skin, we have demonstrated an elegant system on plastic that can be wrapped around different objects to enable a new form of human-machine interfacing…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

Space For All: Small, Cheap Satellites May One Day Do Your Bidding

Someday, swarms of satellites the size of a tissue box will be snapping pictures, taking environmental readings and broadcasting messages from orbit — but the entities controlling those satellites won’t be governments. Instead, they’ll be hard-core hobbyists and elementary-school students, entrepreneurs and hacktivists. In short, anyone who can afford a few hundred dollars to send something to the final frontier. The technology for this outer-space revolution already exists: It’s a type of satellite known as a CubeSat, which measures just 4 inches (10 centimeters) on a side. The CubeSat phenomenon started out as an educational experiment, but now it’s turning into a crowdsourcing, crowdfunding movement of Kickstarter proportions. And not even the sky is the limit…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

How an Outbreak Changed Compounding Pharmacies: The Ophthalmic Side Effects

Compounding pharmacies have been vital to retina since specialists began using bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech, South San Francisco, CA) to treat AMD.

With last year’s fungal meningitis outbreak traced to a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts, these facilities have come under increased scrutiny. Two major compounders in the ophthalmic drug space have reviewed their own processes and made changes to allay the concerns of physicians, while the accrediting organization for compounding pharmacies is handling increased requests for inspections.

Last October, compounding pharmacies came under increased scrutiny when problems with sterile conditions arose at the New England Compounding Center (NECC), leading to the outbreak that resulted in 696 cases of meningitis and 45 deaths in 20 states…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

Microscopic batteries created through 3D printing

Researchers at Harvard have created a 3D-printing nozzle smaller than the width of a human hair, to make microscopic lithium-ion batteries.

As our gadgets shrink ever smaller, the pressure is on to reduce the size of batteries as much as humanly possible. And we’re getting close to a workable solution: scientists have just used 3D printing to build the smallest lithium-ion battery in the world — the size of a grain of sand.

Together with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute, led by senior author Jennifer Lewis, have turned to 3D printing to create tiny stacks of electrodes, tightly interlaced.

The team created a custom 3D printer with a nozzle narrower than a human hair to lay down the ink — but it’s the ink itself that was the trickiest part. First, it had to be able to work as eletrochemically active materials in order to function…

Click Here to Read the Full Article.

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